Philosophy Classes

PHIL 2010 - Introduction to Philosophical Analysis

An introduction to the nature of philosophy through the critical analysis of selected works, such as Descartes, Hobbes, and Locke. The relationship of philosophy to science, religion, and culture will be emphasized.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 2025 - Philosophical Analysis of Policy Choices

An introduction to philosophical questions that may arise in public policy debate and decision making and to resources from the philosophical tradition for addressing them.

Disagreement on matters of public policy often turns on philosophical questions regarding the validity of factual claims, values to be pursued or obligations to be met, and the nature and legitimacy of decision-making processes. This course examines case studies in contemporary policy debate and introduces primary and secondary materials from the philosophical tradition as resources for identifying and addressing these philosophical questions. Case studies may reflect the interests and expertise of the instructor. Resources will be drawn in particular from philosophy of science, ethics, political philosophy, and logic. Course grades will be based on written work, including one or more argumentative essays.3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 2698 - Research Assistantship

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

1 to 12 Credit Hours, 1 to 12 Lecture hours

PHIL 2699 - Undergraduate Research

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

1 to 12 Credit Hours, 1 to 12 Lecture hours

PHIL 3050 – Political Philosophy

An exploration of the main currents in political philosophy from antiquity to the present, seeking resources for analyzing contemporary debates about policy and political process.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3102 - Ancient Philosophy

Development of philosophy in the classical works of Ancient Greek philosophy.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3103 - Modern Philosophy

A study of the development of philosophy from the views of Bacon and Descartes to the beginning of the 20th century. Traces the philosophic response to modern science in the rational and empirical traditions.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3105 - Ethical Theories

Surveys traditional ethical theories of value, obligation, and rights and applies these theories to contemporary social problems such as abortion, euthanasia, poverty and distributional equity, and environmental problems.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3109 - Engineering Ethics

Ethical reasoning in the context of professional work in science and technology. Prepares future technical professionals to approach decisions with a coherent ethical framework.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3113 – Logic and Critical Thinking

The main objective of this seminar is to learn some strategies for clarifying your thinking by structuring and representing arguments. This learning will be based on theoretical reflections on formal and informal logic, on different models of argumentation, and on the role of visualizing arguments for problem solving, collaborative learning, and conflict resolution. The main focus is on a new diagrammatical form of reasoning called “Logical Argument Mapping” (LAM). Argument maps will be created in Cmap, a “knowledge modeling kit” that can be used in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments. This course is useful for any student interested in acquiring a fundamental and versatile ability to think and argue clearly.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3115 - Philosophy of Science

Examination of the nature and processes of scientific inquiry, including the status of scientific knowledge, identification of pseudoscientific claims, and the role of values in generating and using scientific knowledge.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3127 - Science, Technology, and Human Values

Exploration of the boundaries between science, religion, and social values, examining science and technology in a broader social context. Examines claims that science is isolated from social problems and values.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3135 - Philosophy of Technology

The course considers philosophical accounts of how technologies can and should shape our understandings of politics, ethics, and daily life.

3 Credit hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 3140 Philosophy of Food

This course surveys different ways of producing, distributing, and consuming food and examines their consequences for human beings, animals, and the environment. The course is interdisciplinary in nature with a focus on ethics. Topics to be discussed include: the GMO debate; global hunger, food justice, consumer ethics, food and identity, industrial plant and animal agriculture; organic and sustainable agriculture; urban agriculture; workers; overconsumption and obesity, and paternalism and public health.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement

PHIL 3790 – Introduction to Cognitive Science

Multidisciplinary perspectives on cognitive science. Interdisciplinary approaches to issues in cognition, including memory, language, problem solving, learning, perception, and action. Crosslisted with CS, PSYC, and ISYE 3790.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours

PHIL 4110 - Theories of Knowledge

Critical examination of perception, verification, apriori and aposteriori knowledge, meaning and criteria of truth, and cognitive significance of scientific and philosophical propositions. Evolution of epistemology.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4174 - Perspectives in Science and Technology

Comparative analysis of frameworks for interpreting science and technology, discussed in light of case studies. Selected frameworks include philosophical, historical, cognitive, and sociological.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4176 - Environmental Ethics

Conceptual and normative foundations of environmental attitudes and values. Impacts of traditional and modern beliefs that shape human attitudes toward nature on creating a more compatible relationship between humans and their environment.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4698 - Research Assistantship

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

1 to 12 Credit Hours, 1 to 12 Lecture hours

PHIL 4699 - Undergraduate Research

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

1 to 12 Credit Hours, 1 to 12 Lecture hours

PHIL 4752 - Philosophical Issues in Computation

Introduction to metaphysical and epistemological issues in foundations, methods, and implications of computing. Issues include: minds, brains, and machines; representation and language; simulating nature. Crosslisted with CS 4752.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4790 – Seminar Cognitive Science

A seminar-type course in cognitive science focusing on integrating and deepening students' cognitive science knowledge and skills. Topics include memory, language, problem solving, learning, perception, and action. Crosslisted with CS, PSYC, and ISYE 4790

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours

PHIL 4811 - Special Topics

Topics of interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

1 Credit Hours, 1 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4812 - Special Topics

Topics of interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

2 Credit Hours, 2 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4813 - Special Topics

Topics of interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

3 Credit Hours, 3 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4814 - Special Topics

Topics of interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

4 Credit Hours, 4 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4815 - Special Topics

Topics of interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

5 Credit Hours, 5 Lecture hours
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

PHIL 4901 - Special Problems

1 to 21 Credit Hours, 1 to 21 Lecture hours

PHIL 4902 - Special Problems

1 to 21 Credit Hours, 1 to 21 Lecture hours

PHIL 4903 - Special Problems

1 to 21 Credit Hours, 1 to 21 Lecture hours

PHIL 6000 - Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)

An introduction to the fundamental concepts guiding the responsible conduct of research. Students should obtain a fuller understanding of what it means to be a researcher and a professional. They should gain an appreciation for ethical norms and guidelines embraced within their respective field of inquiry.

1 Credit Hours, 1 Lecture hours

PHIL 6710 Ethics Biotech Research

PHIL 6710 is designed to satisfy the RCR Academic Policy for Doctoral Students requirement for in-person training. It will be a recommended course for APPH doctoral students, especially those supported by federal fellowships, and for Robotics graduate students pursuing a healthcare technology minor developed under the new NSF Traineeship program.

Advanced undergraduates may be allowed to enroll in the course during future semesters.

PHIL 1XXX – Philosophy Elective

1 to 21 Credit Hours

PHIL 2XXX - Philosophy Elective

1 to 21 Credit Hours

PHIL 3XXX - Philosophy Elective

1 to 21 Credit Hours

PHIL 4XXX - Philosophy Elective

1 to 21 Credit Hours