Paul Manuel Aviles Baker

COO, Center for the Development and Application of Internet of Things Technologies (CDAIT)

Member Of:
  • Center for Advanced Communications Policy
  • School of Public Policy
Email Address:
paul.baker@gatech.edu

Overview

Paul M.A. Baker, Ph.D., is the Senior Director, Research and Strategic Innovation at the Center for Advanced Communications Policy (CACP), and Chief Operating Officer, Center for the Development and Application of Internet of Things Technologies (CDAIT). He is also a Principal Research Scientist with the School of Public Policy. Previously he was the Associate Director of the Center for 21st Century Universities (C21U). Aside from exploring the diffusion innovation and policy in IoT, recent research projects include innovation driven workforce development, mapping the role of intermediaries in innovation networks, usability of voting technologies, implementation of accessible technologies. His work in policy studies include barriers to the adoption of wireless technologies by people with disabilities, teleworking and people with disabilities; social media innovation, online collaboration and virtual communities. He is also involved in international policy research and collaborative policy networks, especially as it relates to issues of technology and usability policy, workforce development and innovation diffusion.

Baker holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy from George Mason University, a Master’s degree in Theological Studies from Emory University, M.P. in Urban Planning from the University of Virginia, and an M.A. in International Commerce and Policy from George Mason University. He has served on a variety of national boards and panels, and as a grant proposal reviewer for U.S. Department of Education, the Academy of Finland, the Israel Science Foundation, and the NTIA, US Department of Commerce. He serves also on editorial boards and as a reviewer for 15 journals. His co-edited (with Jarice Hanson and Jeremy Hunsinger) volume, “The Unconnected: Social Justice, Participation, and Engagement in the Information Society” was published in 2013. 

Education:
  • Ph.D., George Mason University, Public Policy
  • M.T.S., Emory University, Theological Studies
  • M.A., George Mason University, International Commerce and Policy
  • M.P., University of Virginia, Urban Planning
  • B.S., University of Wisconsin, Zoology
Areas of
Expertise:
  • Disability Policy
  • Information And Communications Technology Policy
  • Innovation Networks
  • Social Media
  • Usability/Accessibility
  • Virtual Collaboration
  • Virtual Community
  • Workforce Development

Interests

Research Fields:
  • Digital Media
  • Emerging Technology and Security
  • Global Cities and Urban Society
  • Information and Communications Technology Policy
  • S&E Organizations, Education, Careers and Workforce
  • Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy
  • U.S. Society and Politics/Policy Perspectives
Geographic
Focuses:
  • Europe
  • Latin America and Caribbean
  • North America
  • South America
  • United States
Issues:
  • Aging
  • Communication
  • Communication Policy
  • Community engagement
  • Diffusion of Technology
  • Digital and Mixed Media
  • Disability
  • Education Policy
  • Emerging Technologies - Innovation
  • Governance
  • Higher Education: Teaching and Learning
  • Innovation
  • International Collaboration and Partnership Development
  • Internet Studies
  • Perspectives on technology
  • Religion and Politics
  • Technology
  • Technology Management and Policy
  • Usability

Recent Publications

Journal Articles

Conferences

  • Diversities of Digital Connectivity: Comparing Approaches for Connecting Rural Communities in the United States and Canada
    In: International Political Science Conference (IPSA), 26th World Congress of Political Science, Virtual, July 2021 [Peer Reviewed]
    Date: July 2021

    Rural broadband connectivity has been an ongoing challenge in the United States (US) and Canada. Initiatives to incent connectivity have been funded by government, the private sector and some combination thereof. What are the variety of policy approaches for promoting and funding connectivity in these countries? Which intermediaries are involved in these initiatives? What results have emerged? This paper will leverage a comparative approach to identify and assess the modalities, intermediaries and expenditure profiles (private-public) to promote rural broadband connectivity.

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  • Platforms, Pandemics and Policy: Technology Innovation and the Internet of Things
    In: International Political Science Conference (IPSA), 26th World Congress of Political Science, Virtual, July 2021 [Peer Reviewed]
    Date: July 2021

    One of the more interesting developments arising from the emergence of digital and wirelessly connected technology-based innovations, is the Internet of Things (IoT). IoT, in reality an ecosystem, or context, of interoperable technologies has already begun to significantly impact the operation of industry and government as well as daily living activities for individual users. With the occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of institutions, including industries and other economic sectors, suffered disruption, which offered an opportunity to observe how IoT devices were adopted and deployed in a variety of innovative ways to address or mitigate these conditions. This paper draws on an analysis of industry and academic publications to examine economic, technological and associated policy changes that affect the design and development of IoT technology, and the consequential social and community impacts. Conditions arising from the pandemic are examined with an emphasis on opportunities for enhanced technology facilitated social participation, and potential policy responses to advances these changes. IoT as a set of technological solutions can be diversified to fulfill a number of strategic objectives in addressing pandemic related economic and social conditions. These impacts further demonstrate that access to information technologies and resources (used here in the broadest sense of enabling actions to occur) is not only universally important, but can be enhanced by policy initiatives, and rapidly so, when the need is perceived.

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