Abe Fellows Global Forum

Japanese and American Innovation in a Global Age

December 1  | 2:00 - 5:00 (cocktail reception to follow)

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

Overview:

Both the United States and Japan have long taken pride in their robust scientific research communities’ contributions to economic growth and human welfare. But the slowing pace and rising costs of research, along with strong competition from China and India, have challenged both governments to rethink their approaches to science and technology policy and set agendas that encourage innovation towards solving big social problems.

The Abe Fellows Global Forum will bring together experts to discuss how the United States and Japan are responding to these challenges, as well as the rapidly rising innovation hubs in China, India and Singapore. Panelists will consider institutional factors that encourage or discourage innovation; the impact of big data and AI on innovation policies and strategies; cultures of innovation in Japan, the US and other Asian countries; conflicts between the interests of companies, national populations, and global welfare; and challenges for the future of scientific innovation.

The speakers include scholars of economics, political science, political economy, engineering and public policy, and organizational sociology.

Agenda

Clary Theater | Bill Moore Student Success Center | Georgia Institute of Technology | Atlanta, GA

14:00-14:50: Session 1

  • Chair: Kaye Husbands Fealing
               Chair, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology

Opening remarks (3 minutes each x 3 people)

  • The Honorable Takashi Shinozuka, Consul-General of Japan in Atlanta
  • Jacqueline Royster, Dean, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Junichi Chano, Executive Director, Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP)

Keynote Address (25 minutes)

  • Takahiro Ueyama, Ph.D.
    Full-time Member of the Council for Science, Technology and Innovation, 
    Cabinet Office, the Government of Japan; Vice President, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)
    Title: “Innovationalizing” Government Investment: Japan’s new STI Policies             

Q&As (10 minutes)

14:50-15:00: Break

15:00-16:45:  Session 2:

  • Chair: Brian Woodall (1992 Abe Fellow)
               Sam Nunn School of International Studies

Presentations: (15 minutes each)

  • Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Ph.D.
    Vincent de Paul Professor of Political Science and Director of the Global Asian Studies Program 
    DePaul University
    Title: “Asia’s New Networked Technonationalism: Competitive Advantage, or Disadvantage for Japan and the United States?”

  • Masaru Yarime, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, Division of Public Policy 
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
    Title: "Governing Data-Driven Innovation: Policy and Strategic Implications in Global Competition and Collaboration"

  • John P. Walsh, Ph.D.
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    Professor, School of Public Policy
    Title: “The organization of science and innovation in Japan and the US”

15:50-16:15 Q&As (30 minutes)

Joined by Takahiro Ueyama

16:15-16:40 Panel discussion (20 minutes)   

16:45 Closing remarks: Linda Grove, Consulting Director, Social Science Research Council (SSRC)

17:00-18:30:   Cocktail Reception

Logistics

The Forum will take place at the Clary Theater in the Bill Moore Student Success Center on Georgia Institute of Technology.
The Bill Moore Student Success Center is located at 225 North Ave. NW, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA. Upon entering the Bill Moore Student Success Center, the Clary Theater is located to the left.
 
Event Date and Time:        

Dec 1, 2:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Event Location:
225 North Avenue NW

Atlanta, GA 30332, USA

Directions and Parking:

From I-75/85 North: Take Exit #249D (Spring Street, West Peachtree Street). At the top of the exit ramp, go through the first intersection (Spring Street). At the next intersection (West Peachtree), turn left. Continue on West Peachtree for approximately one block and turn left onto North Avenue. Cross over the interstate and Techwood Drive. On the left you will come to a large parking lot called Visitor 1 Lot. Simply pull to the gate (on the left once inside the lot) and take a ticket.

From I-75/85 South: Take Exit #249D (North Avenue). At the top of the exit ramp, turn right onto North Ave. Continue on North Ave. approximately 1.5 blocks through the traffic light at Techwood Drive. On the left you will come to a large parking lot called Visitor 1 Lot. Simply pull to the Visitor 1 gate (on the left once inside the lot) and take a ticket.

Directions from Visitor Parking Lot: From the top of the parking deck, proceed across the pedestrian bridge to safely cross North Avenue. Once you have crossed the bridge walk down the ramp to your right and then veer left up the sidewalk toward the Success Center. The Success Center is the large brick building at the end of the sidewalk right and is attached to the west side of the football stadium.

 Airport Transportation

        Mon - Fri        5:00am - 1:00am       Every 10 to 15 minutes
        Saturday        5:00am - 1:00am       Every 10 to 15 minutes
       Bus & Rail Services Schedules: http://www.itsmarta.com/bus-schedules.aspx
       Full list of fares: https://martaguide.com/fares/
  • Rental Car:  Follow the “From the South” I-75/85 directions above.
  • Atlanta Taxi Service - 404.935.9555

Biographies

Takahiro Ueyama

Takahiro UeyamaExecutive Member, Council for Science, Technology, and Innovation, Cabinet Office, Japan
Vice President, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)
2000 Abe Fellow

Professor, Faculty of Policy Management, Keiō University. Born in Osaka in 1958. Received his PhD in history from Stanford University. Has been a research fellow at the Wellcome Institute of the History of Medicine, University of London, and a visiting professor at Stanford University, and dean of the Faculty of Economics, Sophia University. Author of Akademikku kyapitarizumu o koete: Amerika no daigaku to kagaku kenkyū no genzai (Beyond Academic Capitalism: Universities and Scientific Research in Today’s American Academia) and other works.

Masaru Yarime

Masaru YarimeAssociate Professor, Division of Public Policy, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Honorary Reader, Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy, University College London
Visiting Associate Professor, Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Tokyo
Visiting Scholar, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Research Institute
2014 Abe Fellow
 

Masaru Yarime has research interests centering around science, technology, and innovation policy, management, and governance, involving complex and dynamic interactions between technology and institutions in creating innovation. He is particularly interested in exploring the structure, functions, and evolution of innovation systems for sustainability, with a focus on data-intensive innovation recently emerging in a wide range of sectors. He has contributed to many international initiatives, including the United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative on Environmental Risk Integration in Sovereign Credit Analysis, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group III Fifth Assessment Report, and the Expert Group on Policy Support Tools and Methodologies of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Currently he is serving on the editorial board of international journals, includingSustainability ScienceEnvironmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, and Frontiers in Energy Research – Energy Systems and Policy. He received B.Eng. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Tokyo, M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and Ph.D. in Economics and Policy Studies of Innovation and Technological Change from Maastricht University in the Netherlands. His previous positions include Senior Research Fellow at the National Institute of Science and Technology Policy and Project Associate Professor of Science, Technology, and Innovation Governance at the Graduate School of Public Policy in the University of Tokyo.

Kathyn Ibata-Arens

Kathyn Ibata-ArensVincent de Paul Professor of Political Science and Director, Global Asian Studies Program
PhD, Northwestern University
Political Science, Global Asian Studies, Faculty
Political economy; international relations; Japanese political economy; technology policy
2004 Abe Fellow

 

(Depaul) Ibata-Arens specializes in international and comparative political economy, entrepreneurship policy, high technology policy and Japanese political economy. Ibata-Arens' current research, utilizing social network analysis and GIS methodologies, examines emerging life science (biotechnology and medical devices) regions in Japan and the United States. Findings are presented in the book manuscript, Clustering to Win: Firm, Regional and National Strategies in Life Science Entrepreneurship.

Her dissertation research was conducted at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST) at the University of Tokyo as a Fulbright Doctoral Fellow. Ibata-Arens was a JSPS post-doctoral fellow (2002-2003) at the Center for Advanced Economic Engineering (AEE), University of Tokyo and was a fellow in the Alfred P. Sloan/Social Science Research Council Program on the Corporation as a Social Institution (2002). In 2005 and 2006 she was a Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership Abe Research Fellow in the Faculty of Commerce, Doshisha University, Kyoto. In 2008, Ibata-Arens was a Japan Policy Fellow, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Washington, D.C. and received a Sloan Foundation Industry Studies Grant for her work on national entrepreneurship and innovation policy.

Ibata-Arens' book Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Japan: Politics, Organizations and High Technology Firms Cambridge University Press, 2005 analyzes high technology firms and regional economies in Kyoto, Osaka and Tokyo. Other works, on enterprise embeddedness and entrepreneurial business networks, appear in journals including Enterprise and Society and Journal of Asian Business and Management. In 2009-2010 Ibata-Arens was a Fulbright New Century Scholar at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto and was recently selected as a Mike Mansfield Foundation and Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow (2010-2011).

(researchgate) Kathryn Ibata-Arens is Director of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University. Ibata-Arens specializes in high technology policy and Japanese political economy. Her current work is on biomedical entrepreneurship and “networked techno-nationalism” in Asia. She served on the METI-State Department Japan-US Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council (2012-2013) and is a Board of Director for the Japan America Society, Chicago. Twitter: @Ibata-Arens kibataar@depaul.edu

Kathryn Ibata-Arens is Professor and Director of the Global Asian Studies Program, DePaul University. Her current scholarly work focuses on science and technology policy, women’s economic empowerment in Asia, and Japanese political economy. From 2012 to 2013 she served on the METI-State Department Japan-US Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council, and is currently on the Board of Directors of the Japan-America Society of Chicago and a member of the U.S.-Japan Council. Recent research, utilizing social network analysis and GIS methodologies, examines emerging life science (biotechnology and medical devices) regions in Japan and the United States. In 2012, Ibata-Arens was a visiting researcher at the Research Center for Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI, Tokyo) and Ritsumeikan University Research Center for Innovation Management (Kyoto) (2011-2012). In 2008, Ibata-Arens was a Japan Policy Fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, DC and received a Sloan Foundation Industry Studies Grant for her work on national entrepreneurship and innovation policy. Her dissertation research was conducted at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST) at the University of Tokyo as a Fulbright Doctoral Fellow. Ibata-Arens’ book, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Japan: Politics, Organizations and High Technology Firms (Cambridge University Press, 2005) analyzes leading high technology firms and regional economies in Kyoto, Osaka and Tokyo. She received a BA from Loyola University Chicago and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

John Walsh

John WalshProfessor, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology
2001 Abe Fellow

Dr. John P. Walsh is a Professor in the School of Public Policy. He teaches and does research on science, technology and innovation, using a sociological perspective that focuses on organizations and work to explain how research organizations respond to changes in their policy environment. Recent work includes studies of university-industry linkages in the US and Japan, the effects of research tool patents on biomedical researchers and country and industry differences in the role of patents in firm strategy. His work has been published in Science, American Sociological Review, Research Policy, Social Studies of Science, and Management Science. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Kauffman Foundation, the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, the Matsushita Foundation and the Japan Foundation, and he has done consulting for the National Academy of Sciences.

Sponsors

Thank you to all those who helped to make this such a wonderful event: